HEALTHY COMMUNITIES

There are certain basic elements that every neighborhood needs in order for its residents to lead healthy and productive lives: access to nutritious food, safe streets and schools, adequate healthcare, essential city services and recreational opportunity. MOSES asserts every individual’s right to a healthy community.

  • Neighborhood work: through relationships with congregations in each of Detroit’s seven districts, MOSES trains ordinary residents to be leaders and advocates for the health and safety of their neighborhoods. MOSES uses a process of one-on-one conversations, community forums and door-to-door canvassing to unite residents around shared issues of concern for neighborhoods, congregations and schools. Based on the issues identified, MOSES helps connect neighborhoods with the resources, strategies and relationships needed to address these issues.
  • Criminal Justice System: MOSES has taken the lead in working to develop civil citation policies that divert youth from the criminal justice system. These policies offer minors civil infractions for non-violent crimes that an adult would receive a misdemeanor for. Human Impact Partners developed this report about the negative effects of the youth arrest, and the far-reaching, positive impact on our communities we can have by diverting youth from the criminal justice system. 
  • 20170518_100910.jpgHealthcare: In effort to improve healthcare access and outcomes for all, MOSES leaders have organized a Health Equity Task Force, dedicated to eliminating racial, cultural and socio-economic disparities in Michigan’s healthcare system. On May 18th, 2017, MOSES leaders met with a representative from Congressman Mike Bishop's office (MI, Congressional District 8) The meeting brought together representatives from Community Unitarian Universalists of Brighton, St. Pauls Episcopal Church of Brighton , the Pontiac Vicariate - Catholic Community Response Team, and the Pontiac Policy Council to discuss the House legislation of the American Health Care Act (AHCA) and the impact it will have on members of the community. We shared our stories of how changes to the current healthcare system will be devastating on families and the shared why the current Medicaid system should be expanded and protected. The group shared a vision of equity in healthcare and asked for a commitment from the Congressman Bishop to protect and expand Medicaid and to maintain that insurance companies should not charge anyone more or end coverage for persons with preexisting conditions. The MOSES leaders were powerful, informed and provided a thoughtful perspective from the faith community. We want to give special thanks to Rev. Julie Brock from Community Unitarian Universalists of Brighton for hosting our planning meeting to prepare for the action on Congressman Bishops office. 
  • Food access: Lack of access to healthful, fresh food is a citywide concern for Detroit residents. MOSES’ multi-pronged approach to food equity includes advocating for more full-service grocery stores in the city; preserving and maximizing SNAP benefits; ensuring that convenience stores do not sell expired products; and improving safe transportation routes to and from local grocers and markets.
  • Water Equity: A newly imposed drainage free charges non-residential property owners $750 per impervious acre of the property. This is not a sewerage free for treating sewage, but nominally a fee to pay for the cost of draining rainfall from a property. This fee is part of the ongoing fallout of Detroit's bankruptcy. 400 churches in Detroit are at risk of closure because of this recently imposed fee.
    • Contact Executive Director Ponsella Hardaway to get involved (phardaway@mosesmi.org). 

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